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Edward Leroy Page

Edward Leroy Page

Male 1928 - 2000

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  • Name  Edward Leroy Page 
    Born  12 Nov 1928  Carterville, Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender  Male 
    Military  From 8 Jun 1951 to 31 Oct 1953  Korea Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    • The Korean War and Ed Page

      Korea was a sovereign nation until Japan invaded in 1905. About forty years later, during the height of World War II, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt, meeting with his allies Winston Churchill of the United Kingdom and Josef Stalin of the Soviet Union, suggested that Korea be placed under international trusteeship before becoming fully independent again once Japan was defeated. The details of trusteeship were not resolved before the Soviet Red Army destroyed the Japanese Army in Manchuria and pressed into Korea in 1945. As was the case in Europe, the Soviets and Americans agreed to divide the conquest, drawing an arbitrary line across the Korean peninsula at the 38th Parallel. From December 1945 through September 1947, the US and the Soviets tried to come to agreement over the future of Korea. At impasse, the US appealed to the United Nations for resolution in 1948, showed much indecision as to the importance of Korea to US interests, and began withdrawing troops. Ensuing political fighting between the US, the Soviet Union, and the United Nations resulted in two governments coming into power in Korea—a communist rule in the north, led by Kim II Sung, and democratic rule in the south.

      During this time, China and its new chairman Mao Zedong worried about a strong US presence in Asia following World War II. Seeing a shared ideology with the Soviet Union, China signed a treaty of mutual assistance with the Soviets in 1950. Stalin thought a North Korean invasion to unify the peninsula would be useful to the Soviets by increasing Soviet security in east Asia by buffering the Soviets from a renaissance Japan and its potential economic and military power, and a war would help tie the People's Republic of China more firmly to the Soviet Union, making a Chinese rapprochement to the US impossible. Mao believed the only way to unify the Korean peninsula was through war. Seizing on those views and apparent US indifference, North Korean leader Kim II Sung convinced Stalin and Mao that the North Koreans could quickly and decisively capture all of Korea, avoiding any escalation of the war or any involvement by the US—Mao doubted that the US would concern itself with Korea and Stalin pledged that requested war material would be delivered.

      So, on 25 June 1950, the North Korean People's Army, aided by Soviet advisors, launched a blitzkrieg invasion of the Republic of Korea (South Korea), quickly driving across the 38th Parallel and decimating most of the Republic of Korea Army and forcing the US Army southward. On 7 July, the United Nations recommended creation of a United Nations Command (UNC) to defend South Korea, under authority of the US and commanded by General MacArthur, but by August, the North Koreans had pushed the US Army into the extreme southeastern corner of South Korea. US General Walton Walker arrived with his Eighth Army from occupied Japan and formed the Pusan Perimeter to halt the North Korean onslaught. On 15 September, under command of MacArthur, the 1st US Marine and 7th US Infantry completed an audacious amphibious landing at Inchon Harbor, the port for Seoul. After 12 days of intense fighting, UNC forces took control of the capital. Days earlier, General Walker was able to break out from the Pusan Perimeter and began quickly pushing northward.

      By early November, UNC forces had pushed the North Korean People's Army all the way to the frontier with the People's Republic of China. China, not wishing to see North Korea fall, had officially entered the war a month before. Advancing aggressively and without proper precaution, UNC forces were vulnerable to a huge counteroffensive thrown by the Chinese People's Volunteer (CPV) Army. Indeed, nearly 300,000 CPV troops plunged at the UNC forces, quickly pushing them southward. Despite a heroic stand by US Marines at the famous battle at Chosin Reservoir, UNC forces were forced back across the 38th Parallel in complete disarray, losing Seoul. By late November, US President Truman was hinting that the US would use nuclear weapons, General MacArthur was instructed to hold his position without sacrificing his troops, and in late December, after General Walker was killed in a jeep accident, Lieutenant-General Matthew Ridgway was promoted to General and took over the Eighth Army. MacArthur favored an escalation of the conflict to include China, but Ridgway understood the political reality that the war needed to stay on the Korean peninsula. Ridgway re-invigorated the Eighth Army with his "hands-on" style and in early 1951 the UNC counteroffensive, Operation Thunderbolt, began. UNC forces put crippling blows against the CPV Army, pushing back toward Seoul, retaking the former capital and eventually shoving the Communist forces back across the 38th Parallel. In March, President Truman fired MacArthur because the General was repeatedly speaking policy counter to the Truman Administration. Ridgway was made Commander of the UNC forces, replaced on the ground by General James Van Fleet.

      In April 1951, the Communist forces countered again, pushing Van Fleet's Eighth Army back south across the 38th Parallel, but the UNC forces were able to draw a defensive line just north of Seoul. A second surge by the Communist forces pushed the UNC even further south along the eastern edge of the peninsula, but the Eighth Army rebounded with a large counteroffensive that inflicted serious casualties on the Communists, finally bringing them to cease-fire negotiations in July. While negotiations labored, Van Fleet pushed the Communist forces back across the 38th Parallel. In mid November 1951, both sides realized neither had superior forces and agreed on the location of a "cease-fire" line, the line of contact that corresponded to the final thrust of the Eighth Army.

      For the next year and a half, the war was characterized by a heavy air war over North Korea, in which the UNC hoped to bring the Communist forces to the bargaining table by destroying the North Korean war industry and power supply, and a trench war, similar to the trench warfare of World War I. For the Eighth Army, the front line consisted of a Main Line of Resistance (MLR) and a line of outposts. According to Malkasian (2001), "The MLR was a string of mutually supporting strongpoints, constructed to absorb and stop the enemy blow. Outposts were forward of the MLR within No Man's Land. They served to detect and slow an enemy advance." No Man's Land averaged about a half mile wide, and into this zone both the UNC and Communist forces sent regular patrols, both daytime and nighttime, for reconnaissance and harassment. Combat patrols were also used to ambush the enemy, seize outposts, and capture prisoners.

      On 17 January 1952, one such daylight reconnaissance patrol set out into No Man's Land near Kanamdong. Among those of Company L, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, was private first class radioman Ed Page (US 55 073 495). Seven months earlier, on 8 June 1951, Ed had been inducted into the military. He had left his home at 3320 Lawton, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, and his job as a weigh master at the Detroit Stock Yards (Aug 1948 to Jan 1951). Standing nearly 5' 10" and weighing in at 162 pounds, the brown haired, brown eyed Page, along with his radio and perhaps his semi-automatic M-1 Garand Rifle, set out on patrol. The patrol came under small arms and mortar fire from the Chinese Communist forces. According to the official US Army account of that day, "A nearby mortar burst wounded Private Page in the left arm and at the same time shattered his radio. His first thought was to get his radio in operation, and only after realizing that is was damaged beyond repair, did he submit to medical treatment for himself. As the patrol withdrew under the continuing enemy mortar barrage, Private Page volunteered to walk back, in spite of his painful wound, so that the few litters available could be used for other wounded men. Though still bleeding profusely from his wound, he walked a mile and a half back to friendly lines, and was the last of the wounded to reach safety. This unselfish courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit on Private Page and are in keeping with the high traditions of the United States Army." For his valor, Private Page received a Bronze Star medal with Letter "V" on 12 February 1952 for "heroic achievement in connection with military operations against an armed enemy" and the Purple Heart for his injuries.

      The war trudged along the remainder of 1952. General Mark Clark replaced General Ridgway in May, and in October, exasperated over the pace of truce talks, Clark indefinitely recessed the cease-fire negotiations. Rhetoric escalated on both sides and Dwight Eisenhower was elected President. Eisenhower threatened use of nuclear weapons, but it took the death of Josef Stalin in March 1953 before cease-fire negotiations resumed. In May the UNC issued its "final position" to end the war but infuriated Communist forces reacted with a final offensive in July. Their offensive removed the "Kumsong Bulge", a minor alteration to the line of contact formed nearly 18 months earlier. On 27 July 1953, the UNC and Communists signed the armistice ending hostilities.

      On 31 October 1953, after 2 years, 4 months, and 23 days of service, including 5 months and 28 days of foreign service, Edward Page took a physical disability retirement from the military with an Honorable Discharge. For his service, he received a Purple Heart, Bronze Star, the Korean Service Medal, a United Nations Service Medal, and an Occupation Medal for service in Japan. He returned to home at 2023 Marquette Street, Detroit, Michigan.
    _UID  F0F5E587B0043A4F9B110539E0BD1DEC1E9A 
    Died  12 Oct 2000  Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Buried  16 Oct 2000  Rest Lawn Memorial Park, Kentwood, Kent County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    • The funeral was at DeGraff Funeral Home, 10 a.m., with Reverend Cindi Veldheer-DeYoung officiating.

      Section 70. Garden of Peace. Take southern most entrance off Eastern Avenue.
    Page, Edward Leroy (1928-2000) - Military Headstone
    Page, Edward Leroy (1928-2000) - Military Headstone
    Edward L Page
    PFC US Army
    Korea
    Nov 12, 1928 - Oct 11, 2000
    Purple Heart

    Rest Lawn Memorial Park, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan.
    Person ID  I1140  Page-Dumroese
    Last Modified  18 Mar 2013 

    Father  Fred Page,   b. 17 Mar 1891, Steelville, Crawford County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Aug 1961, Neck City, Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Marie Missouri Rustin,   b. 21 Jul 1906, Carterville, Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Mar 1982, Webb City, Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  1926  Carterville, Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorce Filed  26 Jul 1943  Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced  Sep 1943  Jasper County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F426  Group Sheet

    Family  Living 
    Children 
     1. Nancy Jean Page,   b. 29 Oct 1954, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Oct 1995, Dorr, Allegan County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Living
     3. Living
     4. Infant Page,   b. 1963, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1963, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Living
    Family ID  F422  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Nov 1928 - Carterville, Jasper County, Missouri Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - From 8 Jun 1951 to 31 Oct 1953 - Korea Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 12 Oct 2000 - Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 16 Oct 2000 - Rest Lawn Memorial Park, Kentwood, Kent County, Michigan Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos

    » Slide Show
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Page, Edward Leroy
    Page, Edward Leroy
    Edward Leroy Page, circa 1995.
    Page, Edward Leroy as a third grade student
    Page, Edward Leroy as a third grade student
    Carterville, Missouri, Grade 3 class photo, 1938-1939. Edward Leroy Page is in second row, fifth from the left.
    Page, Edward Leroy
    Page, Edward Leroy
    Edward Leroy Page, 8 Jan 1941.
    Page, Edward Leroy and Ella Louise
    Page, Edward Leroy and Ella Louise
    Edward Leroy (left) and Ella Louise Page, circa 1930
    Page, Edward Leroy in uniform
    Page, Edward Leroy in uniform
    Private Page in his US Army uniform; he served in the Korean War.
    Page, Edward Leroy (1928-2000)
    Page, Edward Leroy (1928-2000)
    Edward was an active member of the Disable American Veterans.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

    Documents
    Page, Edward Leroy - Bronze Star Award Letter (National)
    Page, Edward Leroy - Bronze Star Award Letter (National)
    Page, Edward Leroy - Bronze Star Award Letter (Michigan)
    Page, Edward Leroy - Bronze Star Award Letter (Michigan)

    Headstones
    Rest Lawn Memorial Park Entrance, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan
    Rest Lawn Memorial Park Entrance, Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan
    Entrance

    Albums
    Page, Edward Leroy Korean War Medals
    Page, Edward Leroy Korean War Medals (7)
    Medals received by Ed Page for his service int he Korean War: Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Korean Service, United Nations Korean Service, National Defense, and Japan Occupation.

  • Sources 
    1. [S263] 1930 US Census, Webb City, Jasper, Missouri; Roll: 1205; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 31; Image: 911.0. Enumerated 11 April. URL: http://www.ancestry.com/ (accessed November 2007). Search = "Fred Page"; Lines: 1-4..

    2. [S416] Funeral Bulletin/Card/Pamphlet, DeGraaf Funeral Home. Page, Edward L. Sr. b 12 Nov 1928, d 11 Oct 2000. Interment: RestLawn Memorial Park, Rev. Cindi Veldheer-DeYoung, officiating. Survivors: Shirley Page (wife); Karen and Wyatt Knapp; Debbie and Kas Dumroese; Edward and Wendy Page; five grandchildren, one great-grandson, several nieces.

    3. [S170] Bronze Star Citation: Page, Edward Leroy.

    4. [S169] The Korean War.

    5. [S203] US Army Retirement: Page, Edward Leroy.