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Family: James William McKinney/Sarah Poe (F488)  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

m. Nov 1809


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  • Father | Male
    James William McKinney

    Born  20 Sep 1790  Campbell County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  27 May 1873  Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried  1873  Ozark Cemetery, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Married  Nov 1809  [4, 8, 10, 11, 12]  Campbell County, Tennessee  [4, 8, 10, 11, 12] Find all individuals with events at this location
    Father  Henry McKinney | F493 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Unknown | F493 Group Sheet 

    Mother | Female
    Sarah Poe

    Born  2 Feb 1792  Burke County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  20 Mar 1874  Houston, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried  1874  Ozark Cemetery, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Father   
    Mother   

    Child 1 | Male
    Caswell McKinney

    Born  28 Mar 1810  Campbell County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  1881  Houston, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried    Ozark Cemetery, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location

    Child 2 | Male
    David McKinney

    Born  19 Aug 1814  Campbell County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  20 Jun 1900  Houston, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Spouse  Nancy Wade | F486 
    Married  27 Aug 1837  Cole County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Spouse  Isabella Aby Winningham | F491 
    Married  15 Nov 1863  Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location

    Child 3 | Female
    Sarah McKinney

    Born  22 Jun 1830  Cole County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  9 Apr 1891  Laclede County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried    Millsap Cemetery, Lebanon, Laclede County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Spouse  William Hayden Basnett | F510 
    Married  1 Oct 1846  Cole County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location

    Child 4 | Male
    Henry McKinney

    Born  6 Sep 1833  Cole County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  1889  Houston, Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Spouse  Elizabeth Manley | F508 
    Married  Abt 1855   
    Spouse  Nancy Jane Chambers | F509 
    Married  1 Dec 1878  Texas County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location

    Child 5 | Female
    Ira McKinney

    Born  Abt 1835  Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Yes, date unknown   
    Buried     
    Spouse  Trensce | F495 
    Married     

    Child 6 | Female
    Melza Ann McKinney

    Born  Abt 1835  Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Yes, date unknown   
    Buried     

  • Notes 


    • On 18 June 1812 the United States declared war on Great Britain. The US perceived that the British were impeding free trade between the US and France; the French under Napoleon were still at war with the British. The US was irritated that British naval forces were intercepting and searching US ships on the high seas, looking for British deserters and conscripting US citizens for service in the British navy. And, the US believed the British were arming American Indians on the US western frontier in order to restrict US expansion. In the opening days of the war, the US attempted to invade Canada. Subsequently, much of the war was fought along the Saint Lawrence River, on Lake Champlain in New York, and around the Great Lakes. The British, with initial superior naval power, were effective in attacking eastern US ports. They burned all of the significant public buildings in Washington DC, including the White House. The British also assaulted Fort McHenry at the entrance to Baltimore Harbor, giving Francis Scott Key inspiration for the poem that would eventually become the Star Spangled Banner.

      In the southern US, the Creek Indian War (1813–1814) was a war within the war. The Creeks (also known as the Red Sticks), led by Chief Menawa, were supported by the British and Spain. In early 1814, 1000 Creeks established camp on the Horseshoe Bend of the Tallapoosa River in what would become east-central Alabama. On 10 January 1814, in Jacksboro, the seat of Campbell County, Tennessee, Captain John English (Inglish) enlisted volunteers into the 2nd Regiment of East Tennessee Militia, under the command of Colonel Samuel Bunch. According to the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Captain English was one of 20 captains serving under Bunch. Among the men that joined that day were 1st Lieutenant James English, Corporal William Fulkerson, Martin Gouge, and Private James McKinney. Captain English marched his men to Knoxville, Tennessee, where they remained about two weeks, as other units joined them. From Knoxville, they marched to Camp Ross on Lookout Mountain, near the present-day site of Chattanooga, Tennessee.

      General Andrew Jackson commanded members of the US Regular Army, Tennessee militias (including Col. Bunch), and American Indians sympathetic to the United States. Jackson's plan was to fight the Creeks at Horseshoe Bend. So, on 6 March 1814, Captain English and his company left Camp Ross for Fort Williams, located at the mouth of Cedar Creek and the Coosa River in what is now Talladega County, Alabama. Fort Williams was constructed in 1814 to serve as a supply depot to support the impending Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The Tennessee State Library and Archives indicate that Captain English and his company were not part of the battle, but the National Park Service Horseshoe Bend Military Park and Collier's transcription of Captain English's Muster Rolls indicate they were. Either way, James McKinney was sick and left at Camp Ross, along with several other members of the company. On 27 March 1814, Jackson's men routed the Red Sticks. From there, General Jackson led his forces to a decisive battle at New Orleans; this battle, on 8 January 1815, was fought two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent was signed (24 December 1814), which ended the war. Notoriety from his military exploits help Jackson become elected as the 7th President of the United States; he served two terms from 1829 through 1837.

      Perhaps during cold nights during the war, Captain English and his comrades from Campbell County sat about the fire talking about what they would do after the war. Perhaps one of the dreams was to pack up and move 600 miles to the western frontier of the United States.... because that is what they did.

      From Goodspeed's History of Cole County, Missouri, members of the Tennessee Colony (see Henry McKinney for more details) included: "... John Inglish and his four sons, Henry McKenney and three sons [James William, Henry Jr., John], James Miller and five sons, James Fulkerson and three sons, David Young and three sons, William Gooch and four sons, Martin Gooch and two sons, John Harmon and one son, and Joshua Chambers and two sons. This parallels members of the company: James English (Inglish) was Captain John English's son, Private James William McKinney was the son of Henry McKinney, James Miller was a private, Corporal William Fulkerson may have been one son of James, and Martin Gooch (Gouge).

      Sometime during the 1840s, James, Sarah, and family [need to check which members, exactly] moved the 100 or so miles south to Texas County, Missouri. After the Act of 14 February 1871 allowed veterans of the War of 1812 to petition for pensions, James William did so—he completed the "Declaration of Soldier for Pension" form on 19 April 1871 before the county clerk of Texas County. Here he states he was married in Campbell County, Tennessee in November 1809 to Sarah Poe, volunteered in February 1814, and was discharged in May 1814 and that his discharge papers were lost, but that he had received a land warrant for his service. On 22 August 1871, the Department of the Interior asked James to provide official evidence of service as part of Claim No. 12270. On 31 August 1871, J.R. Blakenship, post master at Houston, Texas County, verified the authenticity of James and his witnesses. On 26 October 1871, the Treasury Department indicated James served from 10 January 1814 to 6 March 1814 "when left sick at Camp Ross" and that James was paid for 1 month plus 28 days of service, even though his company was in service until 14 July 1815. Therefore, on 22 April 1872, the Department of the Interior wrote James that his request was declined due to insufficient service (only 56 days of service, not the requisite 60 days needed for pension). So, on 10 May 1872, James sent another letter to the Department of the Interior through the county clerk's office. In the letter he recalls the details of his service, and that of his company, and that for his service he received land warrant No. 56,484 for 160 acres dated 23 February 1857. Even so, on 11 June 1872 the Department of the Interior again rejected his petition.

      Curiously, the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, which maintains the official land warrant records, doesn't show James William McKinney ever receiving land warrant No. 56,484. Sources: [13]

  • Sources 
    1. [S244] War of 1812 - Alabama Trails.

    2. [S236] Missouri: Goodspeeds Cole County History.

    3. [S240] War of 1812 - Horseshoe Bend Military Park.

    4. [S251] Linda Feaster Info on McKinneys.

    5. [S237] Tennessee State Library & Archives.

    6. [S238] War of 1812 - Wikipedia.

    7. [S241] War of 1812 - Muster Roll.

    8. [S316] 1850 US Census, District 98, Texas, Missouri. Roll: M432_421; Page: 10; Image: 20. Enumerated 20 November.(accessed 28 January 2008). Search = "James McKinney"; Lines: 4-8..

    9. [S336] US National Archives, compiled military service records and pension application and pension payment records for James William McKinney. Received 6 March 2008 from Linda Feaster..

    10. [S317] 1860 US Census, Piney, Texas, Missouri. Roll: M653_658; Page: 0; Image: 509. Enumerated 20 June (accessed 28 January 2008). Search "James McKinney"; Lines: 7-12..

    11. [S318] 1870 US Census, Piney, Texas, Missouri. Roll: M593_824; Page: 452; Image: 164. Enumerated June (accessed 29 January 2008). Search: "James McKinney"; Lines: 18-22..

    12. [S336] US National Archives, Compiled military service records and pension application and pension payment records for James William McKinney. Received 6 March 2008 from Linda Feaster..

    13. [S239] War of 1812 - Alabama Dept of Archives & History.