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genealogy of the Page & Dumroese families
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Matches 1001 to 1009 of 1009

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1001 Probably buried in Kettrichhof. Salomea Ziegler
 
1002 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
1003 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
1004 Died during the Influenza epidemic in Clinton, Illinois; married; no children. Wilfred Ziegler
 
1005 Alma Huber wrote: "William... was one of the 4 original Ziegler brothers who came to America: Jacob died in Germany; Christian came in 1828; Michael came first in 1826 and William. Their sister, Eva Maria Gebhard was older. She lived and died in Germany, b. 1785; d. 1827. Eva Maria's brother, Jacob, did not come either. It was his son, Jacob, who was the last to come in 1852. He, Jacob Jr., and Christian landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but Michael landed in New York, New York, while William landed in New Orleans, Louisiana." William Ziegler
 
1006 Born in Clinton, Illinois? William Jacob Ziegler
 
1007 His death record indicates he had married Zwaantje Koerts after Fennechien's death. Gerrit Zwik
 
1008 Description: Mecklenburg-Schwerin was a duchy formed in 1701 through a division of the Duchy of Mecklenburg. In 1815, it became a grand duchy. The area is now part of the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. By a decree dated June 18th, 1819, the first general census of the population of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin was conducted in August of the same year. The first census of this region to have survived extensively, it was conducted by the German Confederation in order to accurately calculate the military quotas of its individual territories. The 1819 census included everyone in Mecklenburg-Schwerin “who was living on the day of the census, as young or as old as they may be, of every gender, religion, occupation, or status.” Unlike later censuses, the 1819 census provides each person’s place of birth, land ownership information, and the length of residence. Source: Mecklenburg-Schwerin Census, 1819. Original data: Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Großherzogtum), Volkszählungsamt. Volkszählung 1819. Landeshauptarchiv Schwerin. 2.21-4/4 Bevölkerungs-, Geburts-, Konfirmations-, Heirats- und Sterbelisten. Viewed at http://Ancestry.com
 
1009 Description: Mecklenburg-Schwerin was a duchy formed in 1701 through a division of the Duchy of Mecklenburg. In 1815, it became a grand duchy. The area of the former Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg is now part of the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. On the night of December 2-3, 1867 a census of Mecklenburg-Schwerin was conducted. The census recorded in a “household list” the names of each person present in the home at the time of enumeration Source: Mecklenburg-Schwerin Census, 1867 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com, 2006. Original data: Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Großherzogtum). Volkszählungsamt. Volkszählung am 3. Dezember 1867. Landeshauptarchiv Schwerin. 5.12-3/20 Statistisches Landesamt (1851-1945). Viewed at http://Ancestry.com
 

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